Martial Law Masquerading as Law and Order: The Police State’s Language of Force

Martial Law Masquerading as Law and Order: The Police State’s Language of Force By John W. Whitehead “Since when have we Americans been expected to bow submissively to authority and speak with awe and reverence to those who represent us? The constitutional theory is that we the people are the sovereigns, the state and federal officials only our agents. We who have the final word can speak softly or angrily. We can seek to challenge and annoy, as we need not stay docile and quiet.”—Justice William O. Douglas, dissenting, Colten…

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Victory! Individuals Can Force Government to Purge Records of Their First Amendment Activity

Victory! Individuals Can Force Government to Purge Records of Their First Amendment Activity By Aaron Mackey The FBI must delete its memo documenting a journalist’s First Amendment activities, a federal appellate court ruled this week in a decision that vindicates the right to be free from government surveillance. In Garris v. FBI, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ordered the FBI to expunge a 2004 memo it created that documented the political expression of news website www.antiwar.com and two journalists who founded and ran it. The…

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Americans Deserve Their Day in Court About NSA Mass Surveillance Programs

Americans Deserve Their Day in Court About NSA Mass Surveillance Programs By David Greene EFF continues our fight to have the U.S. courts protect you from mass government surveillance. Today in our landmark Jewel v. NSA case, we filed our opening brief in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, asserting that the courts don’t have to turn a blind eye to the government’s actions. Instead, the court must ensure justice for the millions of innocent Americans who have had their communications subjected to the NSA’s mass spying programs since 2001.…

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Groped by the TSA? #MeToo And FINALLY We Can Sue

Groped by the TSA? #MeToo And FINALLY We Can Sue By Dagny Taggart Last Friday, a US federal appeals court sided with the people – finally. The court ruled that travelers can sue the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers for “abusive conduct.” This is great news for those of us who are absolutely fed up with the rampant invasive and humiliating screenings at the hands of TSA agents. You know what? Let us call those “screenings” what they often are: Sexual assaults, under the guise of “security.” Anyway, back to…

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Five Concerns about Amazon Ring’s Deals with Police

Five Concerns about Amazon Ring’s Deals with Police By Matthew Guariglia More than 400 police departments across the country have partnered with Ring, tech giant Amazon’s “smart” doorbell program, to create a troubling new video surveillance system. Ring films and records any interaction or movement happening at the user’s front door, and alerts users’ phones. These partnerships expand the web of government surveillance of public places, degrade the public’s trust in civic institutions, purposely breed paranoia, and deny citizens the transparency necessary to ensure accountability and create regulations. You can…

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The Gov’t Gave Her Son a Sex Change Without Parental Consent, And Other Weekly News from The Twilight Zone

The Gov’t Gave Her Son a Sex Change Without Parental Consent, And Other Weekly News from The Twilight Zone By Simon Black, Sovereign Man Welcome to our Friday roll up, where we highlight the most interesting, absurd, and concerning stories we are following this week. Can’t sue cop for breaking domestic violence victim’s bones It all started when a boyfriend playfully tried to push his girlfriend into the pool. Most people would see that as harmless horsing around. But one lady saw domestic violence. So she called the police. Police…

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Facial Recognition: 10 Reasons You Should Be Worried About The Technology

Facial Recognition: 10 Reasons You Should Be Worried About The Technology By Birgit Schippers, Queen’s University Belfast Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It’s common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. The rapid growth of this technology has triggered a much-needed debate. Activists, politicians, academics and even police forces are…

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How Qualified Immunity Became Absolute Immunity for Police Officers

How Qualified Immunity Became Absolute Immunity for Police Officers By Chris Calton When Israel Leija, Jr. was picking up food at a drive-through in 2010, police officers approached his car to arrest him. Leija was guilty of violating his probation, and when the officers informed him that he was under arrest, he sped away. For the next twenty minutes, Leija led the police on a high-speed chase. During the chase, the police used standard tactics to stop Leija. Anticipating his possible routes, they deployed tire spikes in three different areas.…

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We’re All Enemies of the State: Draconian Laws, Precrime & the Surveillance State

We’re All Enemies of the State: Draconian Laws, Precrime & the Surveillance State By John W. Whitehead “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary.”—H.L. Mencken We’ve been down this road many times before. If the government is consistent about any one thing, it is this: it has an unnerving tendency to exploit crises and use them as opportunities for power grabs under the guise of national security.…

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Pentagon Testing Mass Surveillance Balloons to Spy on Vehicles Across the US

Pentagon Testing Mass Surveillance Balloons to Spy on Vehicles Across the US By Julia Conley Millions of Americans across the Midwest this summer are being subjected to surveillance from above as the Pentagon experiments with the use of surveillance radars attached to high-altitude balloons. As The Guardian reported Friday, the defense and aerospace contractor Sierra Nevada Corporation was authorized by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to send up to 25 balloons across six states to track vehicles. U.S. Southern Command commissioned the project for the stated purpose of creating a “persistence surveillance system” to deter…

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